Tag Archives: arduino

Countdown to Christmas with the Arduino advent calendar!

This year, as part of the publicity for their Christmas charity gifts, Concern Worldwide (who I’m lucky enough to work for) commissioned an artist to come up with a design for an advent calendar.

The resulting design by Robert Fiszer is really rather lovely (you can check out the campaign here)- and lends itself rather well to be illuminated as a Christmas decoration for the Concern office.

Concern Advent Calendar designed by Robert Fiszer
Concern Advent Calendar designed by Robert Fiszer

So as a spare tinkering time project I thought I would have a go at building an Arduino controlled LED advent calendar that illuminates the relevant day and counts down to the 24th.

My requirements needed it to be powered by USB, and that it’s a standalone project with it’s own date clock – as the office IT department would frown upon me installing things on my work PC to run Christmas decorations from. In order to do this I needed to read up on using a battery backed up RTC (Real Time Clock) and a way to control 24 LEDs from my arduino micro.

I decided on using a shift register – the other option would be to use a chain of NeoPixel LEDs, but I wanted to learn about shift registers and get an idea about how they worked. For an excellent introduction to shift registers check out this blog from Bildr.

Essentially a shift register is a way of converting a serial signal from the arduino into a parallel series of high and low signals to the output pins on each chip. Each shift register has 16 pins, 8 output pins, 2 earth pins, 2 positive 5 volt pins, 3 serial input pins consisting of clock, latch and time signals, and a final serial output pin which is used when daisy chaining them together.

The 74HC595 8-bit Shift Register I used was available cheaply on ebay and looks like this:

My diagram of a shift register
There are better diagrams out there but this helped me

Wired up with an arduino on breadboard it looks like this:

Teaching myself about shift registers and Larson scanners #arduino #kitt #cylon

A video posted by Pete Taylor (@kimondouk) on

Even with just 8 outputs it looks a bit messy. With 3 shift registers daisy chained together it looks even more complicated:

Now with 3 shift registers and 24leds #arduino #adventcalendar

A video posted by Pete Taylor (@kimondouk) on

But remember the diagram above – the circuit is still fairly simple, what makes it look complicated is the loops of wire which are all the same length. The challenge I found with the chip is that one of the outputs is on one side, with the remaining 7 on the other.

To tidy everything up, I soldered the chips in carriers onto a piece of full sized Adafruit perma-proto breadboard. I highly recommend using this stuff – it costs a bit more than the generic soldering boards you can buy on ebay, but it’s strong and laid out sensibly using the same layout as standard prototyping boards. In my layout I spaced the shift registers 1 hole apart and moved the offside output around the corner of the chip, so that all 8 outputs were on the same side. To connect my LEDs I was able to add 8 socket female headers as I found soldering the LED wires directly into the board was difficult as the stranded copper wire would snap easily. Plus using headers gives me the option to swap out the LEDs for something else in the future. For LEDs I found pre-soldered 5 volt LEDs available on ebay that included the resistor.

My board includes 4 shift registers giving me a total of 32 outputs – this would enable me to re-purpose the board in future, as I’m thinking after advent it would make a nice monthly calendar.

Here’s the board without any of the LEDs attached:

Shift register without the LEDs
Shift register without the LEDs

For the time circuit I used a DS 1307 RTC – the one I used shares the same chipset as the Adafruit one detailed here (link) (normally I’d buy the adafruit one to support their website, but I couldn’t find it available online).

The code:

/*
Shift register calendar
*/

// Date and time functions using a DS1307 RTC connected via I2C and Wire lib
#include <Wire.h>
#include "RTClib.h"

#if defined(ARDUINO_ARCH_SAMD)  // for Zero, output on USB Serial console, remove line below if using programming port to program the Zero!
   #define Serial SerialUSB
#endif

RTC_DS1307 rtc;

// shift register setup

//**************************************************************//
//  Name    : shiftOutCode, Dual One By One                           //
//  Author  : Carlyn Maw, Tom Igoe                               //
//  Date    : 25 Oct, 2006                                       //
//  Version : 1.0                                                //
//  Notes   : Code for using a 74HC595 Shift Register            //
//          : to count from 0 to 255                             //
//**************************************************************//


int SER_Pin = 4;   //pin 14 on the 75HC595
int RCLK_Pin = 5;  //pin 12 on the 75HC595
int SRCLK_Pin = 6; //pin 11 on the 75HC595

int caldate = 0;

//How many of the shift registers - change this
#define number_of_74hc595s 4

//do not touch
#define numOfRegisterPins number_of_74hc595s * 8

boolean registers[numOfRegisterPins];

void setup() 
{
  pinMode(SER_Pin, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(RCLK_Pin, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(SRCLK_Pin, OUTPUT);


  //reset all register pins
  clearRegisters();
  writeRegisters();

#ifndef ESP8266
  while (!Serial); // for Leonardo/Micro/Zero
#endif

Serial.begin(57600);
  if (! rtc.begin()) {
    Serial.println("Couldn't find RTC");
    while (1);
  }

  if (! rtc.isrunning()) {
    Serial.println("RTC is NOT running!");
    // following line sets the RTC to the date & time this sketch was compiled
   rtc.adjust(DateTime(F(__DATE__), F(__TIME__)));
    // This line sets the RTC with an explicit date & time, for example to set
    // January 6, 2014 at 3am you would call:
    //   rtc.adjust(DateTime(2014, 1, 6, 3, 0, 0));
  }
}

//set all register pins to LOW
void clearRegisters(){
  for(int i = numOfRegisterPins - 1; i >=  0; i--){
     registers[i] = LOW;
  }
  writeRegisters();
} 


//Set and display registers
//Only call AFTER all values are set how you would like (slow otherwise)

void writeRegisters(){

  digitalWrite(RCLK_Pin, LOW);

  for(int i = numOfRegisterPins - 1; i >=  0; i--){
    digitalWrite(SRCLK_Pin, LOW);

    int val = registers[i];

    digitalWrite(SER_Pin, val);
    digitalWrite(SRCLK_Pin, HIGH);

  }
  digitalWrite(RCLK_Pin, HIGH);

}

//set an individual pin HIGH or LOW
void setRegisterPin(int index, int value){
  registers[index] = value;
}


void loop() 
{
  DateTime now = rtc.now();
  caldate = now.day();
  Serial.print(caldate);
   Serial.print(now.day(), DEC);
 
  delay(1500);
  clearRegisters();
  delay(500);

  for (int i = 0; i < caldate; i++)
  {
   setRegisterPin(i, HIGH);
   writeRegisters();
  delay(100);
  }
}

Note – the RTC was the trickiest part of the circuit, and after reading lots of posts from people who’ve had issues with the DS1307 I’d recommend using one of the integrated chip varieties.

The code for the calendar is fairly simple – it checks the date from the RTC and then lights up the appropriate number of lights. I’ve made it loop to give a bit more visual interest, but it’s easy enough to modify the code to make it just light up once when you plug it in.

Assembly

I printed out the calendar image and pasted it onto a bit of board with holes behind each ‘light’. Using a frame from a previous project (the Concern general election Swingometer) to bring it all together. To mount the LEDs I used bottle tops – this involved drinking a lot of diet coke, and when I ran out of that, wine.

Back of the advent calendar
Back of the advent calendar

Here’s the final version, in action as if it’s Christmas Eve showing all the lights as I removed the RTC.

The #arduino shift register powered #adventcalendar is now finished! Happy #1stdecember

A video posted by Pete Taylor (@kimondouk) on

If you liked this project, please buy a gift from Concern’s shop – my personal favourite is the solar lights as they are a neat technological solution to the tricky problem of lighting.

Raspberry Pi + Arduino + 8×8 LED Matrix + Python = Raspberry Pi LED display

The other week at work we launched a petition to support lifesaving Aid using a Jumbotron display, so I’ve been inspired to have a go at building a (very) mini version using my Raspberry Pi and an Arduino.

This is a handy way of getting your Pi to display information from any Python app you may have written – so you could use it to make a new email notifier, flash up messages from twitter, or if you’re using your Pi as a server without a monitor – status update messages. I’m interested in using it as a ‘now playing’ message board for an email controlled spotify jukebox I’m working on (more updates to follow).

There are lots of ways you could achieve this – it’s certainly possible to drive LED displays directly from the Raspberry Pi GPIO pins, but this is method is easy to do as it uses off the shelf kits, provides a bit of soldering practice, and an opportunity to learn a bit about Arduinos, Python and serial communications. As with a lot of Arduino projects once you’ve got the hand of how things work you could easily build a cheaper version using only the parts you need. Plus these are my first steps getting an Arduino to do something more interesting than flash a single LED on and off.

I’ve been using a standard Arduino Uno which is available for around £20, and the LED Matrix Shield v.1 from Ciseco which is £5 – this is a Arduino add on board that sits on top of the Arduino. The Matrix shield is fun to put together and good for practising soldering, as a lot of the parts aren’t particularly heat sensitive.

Setting up the Arduino

The instructions that come with the Matix shield are a bit basic – for a much better step by step how to check out this tutorial which I found in the forums.

LED matrix shield Ciseco
LED matrix shield sat on top of an Arduino Duo

Next step is to prepare the Arduino with the code you need it to run. Unlike the Nerdkit microcontroller I mentioned in a previous post the Arduino has a nice user friendly graphical front end – the downside to this is that it runs quite slowly on the Raspberry Pi. I used my Mac to upload the code to the Arduino – just remember to connect it directly to the USB ports on your Mac and not via a USB hub.

First you’ll need to add frequencytimer.h to your Arduino Library – there are instructions on how to install libraries here and you can download frequency timer here.

Then you’ll need to download 8x8LEDMatrix written by Andy Lindsay who has all sorts of other interesting Arduino / Pi stuff on his blog.

The script includes a 5×7 font file which you can experiment with to get the display to show different characters. Compile and upload this to your Arduino to check that everything’s working properly.

Now you’ll need to modify Andy’s code to send the text you want your Arduino to display over the serial port. Using a tilda character clears the script (although I discovered you don’t actually need this as the Pi resets the Arduino when it communicates with it on the serial port)

/*
 * Show messages on an 8x8 led matrix,
 * scrolling from right to left.
 *
 * Uses FrequencyTimer2 library to
 * constantly run an interrupt routine
 * at a specified frequency. This
 * refreshes the display without the
 * main loop having to do anything.
 *
 */

#include
#include &amp;amp;quot;font5x7.h&amp;amp;quot;

#define DELAY 80

int incomingByte = 0;   // for incoming serial data
String incomingString; // for the incomming serial data string
char message[] = &amp;amp;quot;&amp;amp;quot;; // define the message

byte col = 0;
byte leds[8][8];

// pin[xx] on led matrix connected to nn on Arduino (-1 is dummy to make array start at pos 1)
int pins[17]= {
  -1, 17, 8, 7, 19, 9, 13, 4, 10, 6, 5, 18, 3, 2, 11, 12, 16};

// col[xx] of leds = pin yy on led matrix
int cols[8] = {
  pins[13], pins[3], pins[4], pins[10], pins[06], pins[11], pins[15], pins[16]};

int rows[8] = {
  pins[9], pins[14], pins[8], pins[12], pins[1], pins[7], pins[2], pins[5]};


void setup() {

  // sets the pins as output
  for (int i = 1; i  0) {

                // read the incoming byte:
                char incomingByte = (char)Serial.read();

                incomingString += incomingByte;

                if (incomingByte == &amp;amp;#039;~&amp;amp;#039;) {
                  // using a tilda ~ clears the string

                incomingString = &amp;amp;quot;&amp;amp;quot;;

                }

                // check string for command variables

                incomingString.toCharArray(message, 160);



                }





  scrollMsg( message );




}

void clearLeds() {
  // Clear display array
  for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
      leds[i][j] = 0;
    }
  }
}

void setChar(char ch) {

  for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    unsigned char bt = pgm_read_byte(&amp;amp;amp;(smallFont [(ch-32)*5 + i] ));
    for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
      leds[j][i+1] = (bt &amp;amp;amp; 0x01);
      bt = bt >> 1;
    }
  }
}

void slideChar(char ch, int del) {
  for (int l = 0; l < 5; l++) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 7; i++) {
      for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
        leds[j][i] = leds[j][i+1];
      }
    }
    unsigned char bt = pgm_read_byte(&amp;amp;amp;(smallFont [(ch-32)*5 + l] ));
    for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
      leds[j][7] = (bt &amp;amp;amp; 0x01);
      bt = bt >> 1;
    }
    delay(del);
  }

  for (int i = 0; i < 7; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
      leds[j][i] = leds[j][i+1];
    }
  }

  for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
    leds[j][7] = 0;
  }
  delay(del);
}


// Interrupt routine
void display() {
  digitalWrite(cols[col], LOW);  // Turn whole previous column off
  col++;
  if (col == 8) {
    col = 0;
  }
  for (int row = 0; row < 8; row++) {
    //    if (leds[col][7 - row] == 1) {
    if (leds[col][ row] == 1) {
      digitalWrite(rows[row], LOW);  // Turn on this led
    }
    else {
      digitalWrite(rows[row], HIGH); // Turn off this led
    }
  }
  digitalWrite(cols[col], HIGH); // Turn whole column on at once (for equal lighting times)
}

Once you’ve uploaded this you can test its working properly by clicking on the serial monitor icon (the magnifier glass on the right hand side) and typing some text – if everything is working OK you’ll see the text appear on your Arduino’s matrix display.

Arduino software
Click on the magnifier icon on the right hand side

Setting up the Raspberry Pi

Now you need to connect the Arduino to the Pi. I’ve used one of the Pi’s USB ports rather than via a USB hub – you could also use the serial pin on the GPIO port to do this as well. Make sure the Arduino is connected before you power up the Raspberry Pi.

You can test the Pi -> Arduino control with minicom (thankyou http://codeandlife.com/2012/07/29/arduino-and-raspberry-pi-serial-communication/

Install minicom on the pi via the console:

sudo apt-get install minicom

then run minicom and connect it to the Arduino:

minicom -b 9600 -o -D /dev/ttyAMA0

Hopefully everything you type into the console will be appearing on the Arduino Matrix.

Next is to get Python to send data to the Arduino over the serial port. Install the python serial libraries:

sudo apt-get install python-serial

Now you’re ready to write some Python code to control the Arduino’s LED display. I’ve been using the IDLE app on the Raspberry Pi. The following code is a super simple python script that can send some text to the LED Matrix:

import time
import serial

#configure the serial connection

ser = serial.Serial("/dev/ttyACM0",9600)

ser.open()

# add some time delays to stop the Arduino resetting

time.sleep(1.5)

ser.isOpen()

time.sleetp(1.5)

ser.write("Raspberry Pi")

Hit f5 and you should see this:

Arduino LED MAtrix Shield v1.0 IOT Research 2012
Bingo! or whatever you want it to say…

And that’s it – you now have a neat way of controlling an LED display with Python. The LED display always shows the last message it received until it gets a new one.

Update: Cisco – the company who made the lovely shield kit, are now doing a kickstarter for a Pi version with a lot more red or white LEDs that plugs directly into the GPIO. 

MaKey MaKey + Moleskine notebook + Graphite pencil = sketchy controller

As part of my ongoing kickstarter addiction I’ve recently acquired a MaKey MaKey – a sort of universal keyboard adapter gadget based on an Arduino-type microcontroller, that lets you turn virtually anything that conducts electricity into a USB keyboard or mouse.

MaKey MaKey board
It even lights up when you plug it in..

The board comes supplied with a pack of crocodile clips and a nice long USB cable – on the MaKey MaKey website there’s a list of ideas to try (apparently bananas work well as a piano). All you have to do is find something suitably conductive, connect them up with the clips, and away you go.

The simplest interaction is creating a space bar input – this Olympic hurdle game from the ONE Campaign works well as something to try.

I’ve done a bit of experimenting to see what conducts with the aim of making controller doodles in my moleskine notebook. Conductive paint from these guys works – interestingly metalic effect paint and ink doesn’t work (I suspect as the metal is in a suspension).

The easiest and most sketchable I’ve found is using a big chunky graphite pencil like this one KOH-I-NOOR Jumbo Woodless Graphite Pencil 6B available from amazon for a couple of quid:

image of moleskine jump button and MaKey MaKey
hitting the gap between the U and the M creates a space bar press

You have to press quite hard with the pencil to get a good circuit – shorting the gap between the U and the M with your finger is enough to register as a space bar press:

Playing the race against hunger game with a MaKey MaKey
Ignore my score, it’s hard to hit jump and hold a camera at the same time..

So there you are – a sketchable, moleskine portable control interface! (even if it does get a bit smudgy after extended play).

Check out the ONE Campaign race against hunger game here.